Year: 2020

10 Best Android Apps for Editing Photos

The ability to phone is absolutely essential sometimes and can make your life better, especially if you regularly take lots of photos. Luckily enough, there are many good apps to help you with that. Let’s take a look at some of the best, most popular and most effective photo editing apps for Android.

Best Android Apps for Editing Photos

Best Android Apps for Editing Photos

  1. Snapseed

positions itself as a complete, all-in-one photo editor for your mobile device. It is developed by Google. The list of features is pretty extensive and includes many different filters to transform and modify your image, add additional special effects to it. You can apply changes only to selected areas if you want to.

The benefits of the app include that fact that you don’t have to create an account, it is very easy to use, and there are a lot of excellent tools. There are also no ads so the user experience remains smooth. Some consider it to be the best Android app for pic editing, though there is much more to explore.

  1. YouCam Perfect

YouCam Perfect is an editor geared particularly towards editing selfies. It has lots of different tools to make your selfie look awesome. There are little face beautifying gimmicks, filters, special effects. You can also add stickers and text labels to your photo.

People really like all these filters that can make your face cute. Using YouCam Perfect, you can change your skin every day – each time using a different combination of filters. The selection of filters is really nice and you can easily prepare a new profile photo of yours before uploading it to a social network. However, certain features are only available to premium users.

  1. Adobe Lightroom

is a popular tool developed by Adobe. It includes many different options to adjust and customize your photos. It is particularly suited for processing raw photos. When editing a photo, you can compare the new version with the original in order to make the right adjustments. You can edit landscapes, faces, group photos. As evident from the name, there are advanced capabilities for adjusting the lights so that your photo can become more tuned and balanced.

The downsides of this app include the need to have Adobe ID and log in to the app with it.

  1. TouchRetouch

This mobile app is rather peculiar because it is not focused on ordinary editing. Instead, it is focused on letting you remove small details from your photos. You can wipe away imperfections, pockmarks, lines, as well as entire objects, even people. TouchRetouch helps you remove unnecessary items in such a way that it becomes virtually unnoticeable, it leaves no traces.

Tinkering with your photos and removing objects from them can be pretty funny. Great when you want to remove unwanted stuff too.

  1. Photo Effects Pro

Photo Effects Pro is a small, nifty tool for quickly editing your mobile photos while giving them a professional or exotic appearance. The app is easy to use and there are some nice filters and effects that other apps lack. There are some unique filters like the one that turns your photo into a work of art and exquisite painting effects. You can leave notes on your photos as well, even write with your finger. Overall, the app is pretty nice to play with.

This Android app is pretty unique in several ways. It provides not only rich editing capabilities, but also offers you the chance to monetize your photos by periodically holding contests and events for you. By joining PxBee, monetizing your photos becomes easy – they will appear in web and media …

Stock Photography Images from Fotolia.com And Dreamstime.com

Fotolia.com and Dreamstime.com are two Web sites that offer stock photography images that are reasonably priced and accessible to freelance AC content writers. Fotolia.com is better than Dreamstime.com, but neither one is better than 123RF.com, which I’ve discussed elsewhere.

Fotolia.com offers a few, usually fifteen, stock photograph images as free royalty-free images, but the quality is usually pretty ordinary. The link to the Free Photos is at the bottom of the page in the footer. The purchasable royalty-free images have a really nice range and versatility. What you can’t find elsewhere in a free royalty-free image, you can surely find at Fotolia.com.

Fotolia.com is an internationally based Web site with sites opened in Espana, France, UK, Deutschland, Italia, Portugal, and Brasil. Photographers who contribute to Fotolia.com hail from even more places than that including, for example, the Russian Federation and Poland. This diversity adds tremendously to the range of subject matter.

Fotolia.com maintains a high standard of selection providing quality professional images for users to choose from. Aside from the fifteen or so free images, all of Fotolia.com image use licenses are sold at a reasonable rate. Three image sizes of Medium (standard), Large, and XLarge are potentially available, some images may only be available in one or two of the sizes. The standard rates for use are $1, $2, and $3 dollars for the respective sizes. Purchases are made through Credits.

In order to make purchases at Fotolia you must be registered with the site and registration is free. Then you must purchase a Credit package starting at $10 equaling 10 Credits. This is not the best choice for Content Producers who write content, but if you simply must have an image to go with your article, then at $1 a standard image sized royalty-free image is a viable option. Purchases can be made through PayPal, which all Content Producers are used to using, or through credit card. If you dislike these methods, you may contact to make other arrangements.

Downloads of images from Fotolia.com can be obtained one of three ways. You may download a JPEG file to your computer by Saving from a dialog box. You may save a Bitmap image through Rescue Download and Saving from a full screen view of the image. Or you may have it emailed to your Inbox. When I did this, it opened in my Adobe.

Dreamstime.com is my least favorite source for stock photography images. They have a selection of about ten or so free royalty-free images. And they also sell their purchasable royalty-free images for $1, $2, or $3, equaling 1, 2, or 3 Credits. The Credit packages available from Dreamstime.com start at $20 and equal 20 Credits. They also offer Subscription packages, like 123RF.com, that start at $89 for 30 days. Subscription packages lower the cost of the images to “as low as $0.27”, with a total daily limit of 10 images downloaded.

The quality of stock photographs available at Dreamstime.com is good but not as consistently good as 123RF.com or Fotolia.com. I don’t very often find images that I wish to use. And I don’t want to pay $20 when I can get high quality free images elsewhere.

Both Fotolia.com and Dreamstime.com have affiliate referral programs whereby a registered member can gain monetary rewards. Each participant agrees to put a Dreamstime “badge” on their Web site, placement of the badge will be confirmed within a few days. Individuals who click to Dreamstime.com through this badge will be identified and a percentage of their purchases is assigned to affiliate.

So, there are resources available to content writers for …

How to Launch a Photography Business Without Your Own Full Time Studio

So you've been considering making the leap from amateur and enthusiast to professional. You've got the gear you need to start, and your skills are up to snuff. You've thought about marketing and promotion.

There's just one thing that stands in your way: a studio.

If your intended photography business has anything to do with taking portraits of people, then you'll probably want a studio to call home. The problem is, this can cost you $1,000 to $2,000 or more per month after you consider rent and other costs.

That's a hefty financial commitment to make, and it presents a bit of a catch-22. If you don't have a successful photography business, how do you afford to the rent for a studio? And if you don't have a studio in which to shoot clients, how do you grow and develop a successful photography business?

While you could always take out a loan and gamble on your success, here are four other options that let you work with clients, build your brand, and grow your business before you commit to a full time studio of your own.

Partner With an Existing Photographer. You're not the only one struggling to pay the bills and fill up a shooting schedule with clients. Chances are, there's a photographer near you with a studio that isn't being used 24/7. The rent is already paid, and every hour that studio sits idle is a wasted resource.

So don't hesitate to reach out to other businesses and try to come to a mutually beneficial agreement. One of my old students interned with a local photographer for a few months, and he agreed to let her use the studio for her own work. She had to share some of the proceeds with the studio, but she had nowhere else to shoot and this allowed her to take a few clients on the side and start building her brand.

Rent a Space by the Hour. Instead of striking an agreement with a potential competitor, you may be able to find a studio space that you can simply rent by the hour. If you work near a major metro area, then you shouldn't have trouble finding a handful of places like this. Contact the owner, find out their hourly rates, and visit the facilities.

If it's going to cost you $40 an hour to rent the studio, then simply build that into the price of your portrait session. After all, when you rent your own studio you'll have to cover the cost of that rent, and this is a good way to ensure that you don't undersell yourself.

Work Outside, or On Location. This is probably the most common tactic, but it works. The great outdoors are, well, free! Scout a few parks in the area, and make a short list of nice shooting locations. There's a park down the road from my house with a gazebo, a large lake, and some scenic woodsy areas. I routinely see people there on the weekends with a photographer, either for portraits or as part of a wedding.

The only problem with this is that you're at the mercy of the weather. No one wants to have a portrait session outside in the rain, and I suspect few people want to pose outside in the wintry cold for an hour, either. It's hard to book things with absolute certainty when you don't know what the weather is going to be like.

Travel to the Client. There is another free alternative, though. Travel to the client's home. Assuming you have …

Difference Between a Server and a Computer

It is improper to talk about this difference, as , and a computer can be used as a server. However, beginners in the online world commonly make this mistake, and here is why this difference appears.

The first people who build online websites tens of years ago didn’t have the services of at their disposal. Besides the difficulty of building a website entirely in HTML, there was also the problem of keeping the site online. This could only be done with personal computers, which were used as servers for this purpose.

 

Practically, the server had to be on all the time, for the visitors to find the website online. It was pretty challenging to set up such a server and to maintain it, so the hosting companies that appeared a little after this time were surely a blessing for website builders.

A company owns a large number of servers, which are no more than computers that are always online. This way, the web designer will make sure his website is still online and can be found by visitors. These servers are no more than high performing computers with large hard drive capacity. They can host thousands of websites at the same time, offering increased security and solid maintenance as well.

Can I use my computer as a server?

If you ever played a PC game in the Local Network, then you should know how this works. One of the players creates a game, and all the other players can find the match in LAN and connect to it. The central computer is a server in this case, but its role stops at the moment when the multiplayer game ends. This is only an example of how a simple computer can be used as a server.

Today, practically any computer can be used as a server. Your smartphone can be a server when you create a HotSpot for your friends. Your X-box is a server if you host an online game of FIFA with other players. However, as Personal computers are rarely used as servers for online websites, the confusion between computers and servers is not as common as it used to be.

 So what is the difference between a server and a PC today?

Both computers use the same components, such as RAM memory, processors, and sources. However, the rest of the hardware might be completely different between the two devices. Servers have more complicated components, as well as hot-swap elements. Hot-swap hardware is a component that can be replaced while the device is working. It is a handy feature for a server that needs different RAM capabilities at different times of the day.

It is still possible to use PCs as servers today, but it is entirely overrated and inefficient. If you want to build a website that is online all the time, you should consider finding a web hosting company instead of   the site on your computer.…

Photoshop Editing Hints: Adding Lighting Effects

An ordinary photo has extraordinary possibilities when you open it in Adobe Photoshop CS2. In this tutorial, I’ll tell you how you can make some dramatic changes in your next photo by adding one of the lighting effects that come standard with your copy of Photoshop.

To begin, select a photo that you would like to work with and then create a copy of that photo so you don’t risk destroying the original version.

Next, you’ll want to sharpen your photograph using the found under Filters in your menu options. Once your image is crisp and ready to go then it’s time to start looking at some options for lighting effects.

To locate the lighting effects, go to Filter, Render, Lighting Effects in your Photoshop menu. You will then see the lighting effects dialogue box which will give you some options for controlling the kind of lighting you want to add to your photograph.

When you first open your lighting effects dialogue, Photoshop will set the lighting as being “Default”. Other options are available by using the pull down to look through the list of pre-installed lighting settings. Options such as Triple Spotlight, Flood Light and Flashlight are among the many options that are available. Click through each of these options to see the preview effect that it will have on your image. For the photo in my example, I selected the Flashlight option.

Once you’ve selected the type of lighting option you would like to use, you have the option of relocating the center point of the lighting effect, as well as the diameter of the effect by clicking and repositioning the points within the lighting effects preview box. Take a few minutes to play with these settings to get your lighting where you want it in order to make the greatest impact on your photo.

Some other adjustments that are in the lighting effects dialogue include an intensity slider which lets you control how weak or how strong the lighting effect is, and a focus slider which allows you to control how narrow or wide of a lighting effect is added. There are also sliders which can help you control the Gloss, Material, Exposure, and Ambience of the image. Adjust these sliders freely to see the many varieties of effects that can be created with just a simple click.

Once you’re satisfied with your lighting effects settings click on okay to apply those settings to your image. If you aren’t satisfied with your results, simply go to Edit, Step Backward, or use your History pallet to undo your effect and start over again.

In my example image, I went a few steps further after adding the lighting effect and desaturated the image by going to Image, Adjustments, Desaturate. I then applied one of the Underwater Photo Filter that is found under Image, Adjustments, Photo Filters.

By including lighting effects in your photo editing projects you can give your photos the punch they need to really stand out!…

Best Lens For Photography

Regardless of the specific camera model you use, or only rely on third-party equipment, we hope that this article will provide you with the best information you need when choosing a lens.

Lenses are very important to your life as a photographer – they influence the way you portray a location or objects. The best lenses will also allow you to impart your own personal vision on images, and make the result suit your intentions. Read on for our reviews on the best lenses in the game.

Nikon AF-P DX VR – best for wide angle zooming

This has gained a positive reputation among many users in a short time, especially considering its low weight, fast focus, and very good optical performance.

Note: the AF-P lenses are only compatible with the latest DLSR models from Nikon.

Features

  • Ultra-wide view, which even surpasses Kit Lens types
  • Focus distance (smallest) is 0.8 ft./0.22 m, regardless of zoom position
  • It has VR (Vibration Reduction) image stabilization to keep videos and photos sharp, even when handheld
  • Almost silent autofocus stepping motor

Compared to its predecessor, the range of view is less, coming in at 10 to 200mm. Even if you might be disappointed by the noticeable blurring when using it in close up shots, it will make up for this in its size and weight – as well as the shorter zoom-in focal point.

Pros

  • Very sharp photos
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Optical stabilization for better focus
  • Covers a very wide viewing angle
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Narrow aperture
  • Noticeable distortion in the barrel
  • Its corners tend to dim out
  • Experiences chromatic aberration

Verdict

There are some big things that are going well for these lenses, such an optical stabilization, sharp optics, lightweight build, and ultra-wide viewing field. However, the distortion is quite heavy, and the widest angles suffer from weaknesses in edge sharpness – but it presents a budget-friendly choice, and will work for you in many circumstances.

Sigma 17-70mm DC Macro HSM Lens – best pick

Among the Sigma lineup of lenses, this is among the first that was released by the company, coming in the ‘Contemporary’ group of products.

Features

  • HSM Lens of aperture f/2.8-4 DC
  • Zoom type of lens
  • Lens mounts in use are the Pentax KAF3, Nikon F, Canon EF-5, Minolta Alpha DR, and the Sigma SA Bayonet.
  • The smallest focusing distance is 8.6in/22cm regardless of zooming range
  • Filters of 72mm
  • Constructed from thermally stable composite material
  • Maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9
  • 7 diaphragm blades

The balance between the maximum aperture and zoom range uses a fine balance, and this makes it ideal for photographers who want a general purpose zoom of high quality, and also those looking for a camera that can handle everyday use.

Pros

  • The focus of the lenses is very sharp, regardless of focal length
  • The clarity and color are great
  • Its focus ring is smooth and wide (when you apply correct amounts of drag)
  • It remains retracted even while you move around with it
  • Works very well even without flash photography

Cons

  • Not very good at handling wide shots

Verdict

This camera lens offers both fast zoom and an extended range zoom. These features allow it to be a useful upgrading option, especially if you have outgrown your kit zooms and are an SLR shooter.

Sigma 30mm (for Canon) F1.4 Art DC Lens – best single focal length lens

When using a prime lens, you will notice that it is simply a single focal length. Thanks to the removal of the zoom, it will allow the lenses to become sharper, lighter and smaller, while allowing more light …

Avoid Family Photo Faux Pas With These Photography Tips

As a family and wedding photographer, I have seen my fair share of disastrous family photos. After all, who can resist those tempting photo articles of the awkward family photos? However, as a professional, I give my clients the following tips to avoid those photo faux pas:

Don't try to be something you're not.

Do you love those beautifully posed magazine photos of the perfect family wearing all white on the beach? You know, the ones with the mother's hair beautifully blowing in the wind and the father playfully lifting up his kids? I'll tell you right now, those photos are one in a million. Most real families have tears, stains and bad hair days. Find a photographer willing to work with who you really are, not who you want to be.

Don't try to be too matchy matchy.

If your family doesn't always match their outfits perfectly, why would you want a fake family portrait that shows you as something you're not? I always advise my clients to wear something the feels comfortable and goes well with the other outfits in the photo. Try to avoid heavy patterns or shirts with words on them, but the days of matching your outfits perfectly are over.

Work with your realistic schedule.

If you have young kids, your photo shoot should work around their schedule. Pick a time when they are well rested, fed and have a lot of energy. Additionally, find a photographer who is patient when your little one needs a snack or even a quick break.

Find a background that makes sense for your family.

A great family portrait is classic and timeless. Therefore, you want a background that makes sense for your family long-term. Try to avoid seasonal or holiday shots, such as a photo in front of your fire place if it's covered with holiday decorations or an outdoor winter photo with everyone bundled up in hats and gloves if you want to hang it up year round.

Consider the behind the scenes shot.

Some of the best photos are the candid photos your photographer captures when you're not posing. Ask to see all of the proofs, not just the ones your photographer thinks look perfect. You may be surprised how much you love the pictures that aren't posed and instead show your true family's interaction.…